How To Prepare Spaghetti Squash 3 Different Ways

Spaghetti Squash. If you are one of the few people who actually know what a spaghetti squash is, it’s probably safe to say you can only prepare it one way. Squash as spaghetti. Served with … what? Yep, you guessed it, pasta sauce.

Well, prepare to have your minds blown! We recently did a cooking demo at the Detroit Eastern Market where we displayed three different dishes using that oblong yellow vegetable. And, to add more of a wow factor, all three dishes can be created in 30 minutes or less.

With the varying dietary intake that has America divided like the current presidency, we decided to offer one dish as vegan, one as vegetarian, and one as carnivorous.

We’ll get more into that later. For now, let’s describe a spaghetti squash and briefly review its health benefits. If you’re in the majority of the people who haven’t even heard of this vegetable, then you’ll probably asking yourself “what is a spaghetti squash?” Picture this … a winter vegetable with a hard pale yellow exterior with a stringy flesh. Got an image in your head? Ok good, hold on to that for a sec.

Now let’s take a moment to reflect on the nutritional value of the almighty spaghetti squash. First of all, it’s very low in calories. I mean … we’re talking less than a half a gram of fat per cup. It’s also low in carbs, containing only 10 grams per cup. Two things this squash is high in is fiber and water content. All of these qualities bundled together makes the spaghetti squash pretty darn attractive!

  • good for weight loss
  • good for weight management
  • aids in regulating digestion
  • helps to reduce constipation
  • helps to lower cholesterol

Ok, enough of that. Let’s get back to the good stuff … how to take this vegetable nerd and turn it into three different delicious dishes.

The first dish is Spaghetti Squash with Rustic Tomato Sauce. It’s a hearty dish that warms the stomach on a rainy day. Vegan.

Spaghetti Squash with Rustic Tomato Sauce

 

 

The next dish is Spaghetti Squash Casserole. This meal is a flavorful twist on the classic spaghetti and meatballs. Carnivorous.

Spaghetti Squash Casserole

 

The final dish is Fried Quinoa Spaghetti Squash Cakes with a Moroccan dipping sauce. This is an appetizer that will surely impress anyone who takes a bite. Vegetarian.

Fried Quinoa Spaghetti Squash Cakes

Dipping Sauce for Fried Quinoa Spaghetti Squash Cakes

Trust me … you’ll be pleasantly surprised by this vegetable nerd. I do hope you enjoy these recipes. Don’t be afraid to experiment with them. Don’t be afraid to interchange ingredients. Don’t be afraid to make them your own.

Antioxidant Salad

Not only is this dish a display of beautiful colors, but it’s also extremely nutrient-dense. This salad has everything from cucumbers to carrots, peppers to pomegranates, and seeds to scallions. And yes, I case you were wondering, those are black beans.

So, what exactly is an antioxidant? An antioxidant is a substance that removes potentially damaging oxidizing agents in a living organism. Oxidation is a chemical reaction that can produce free radicals. This can lead to chain reactions that may damage cells. That’s why it’s so important to get your fair share of antioxidants from your food.

Antioxidant Salad 1

Antioxidant vitamins are A (fruit, vegetables, and eggs), C (fruit and vegetables), and E (vegetable oils, nuts, and seeds). We constantly hear how various berries are full of antioxidants, but did you know you can get the same (and in many instances, more) level of antioxidants from fresh vegetables? Let’s take a look at the nutrient (protein, vitamin, and mineral) breakdown of our Antioxidant Salad …

Romaine Lettuce: vitamin A, B vitamins, vitamin K, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and potassium.

Spinach Leaves: iron, vitamins A, C, and K, vitamins B1 and B6, magnesium, manganese, and potassium.

Black Beans: fiber, protein, vitamin A, calcium, iron, copper, phosphorus, and manganese.

Cucumbers: fiber, potassium, vitamins A, C and K.

Carrots: beta-carotene, vitamins A and C, copper, calcium, potassium, manganese, phosphorus, folic acid, and fiber.

Red Bell Peppers: fiber, vitamins A, B6, and C, iron, copper, zinc, potassium, magnesium, manganese, and selenium.

Pomegranate Seeds: fiber, vitamins C and K, calcium, copper, potassium, and magnesium.

Pumpkin Seeds: magnesium, manganese, B vitamins, vitamin E, copper, potassium, calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc.

Scallions (Green Onions): fiber, manganese, potassium, vitamins A, B6, C and K, and copper.

Antioxidant Salad 2

Now you know why this colorful display of vegetables, legumes, and seeds has been named the Antioxidant Salad. Click on the link below and follow this delicious yet nutritious recipe to “Eat the Rainbow” and all the antioxidants your body needs and loves!

RECIPE: Antioxidant Salad

 

Collard Green Cool Down

It’s officially Fall in Michigan. Aside from the classic favorites like cinnamon donuts, honey crisp apples, and hot cider, we also know it’s the ultimate season for fresh collard greens. Why you ask? Because farmers and consumers alike love to pick collard greens out of the ground after the first frost.

You see, the toughness of collards breaks down in extreme temperatures. Collards cook much quicker once they’ve been dusted with a light frost. The same holds true with these nutrient-dense greens and extreme heat. They break down much faster and reduces the cooking time when cooked over high heat.

Want to use your beautiful fresh collard green leaves in a non-traditional way? Consider these ideas: Mexican Collard Green Burritos or Collard Green Veggie Wraps. Either way, you won’t be disappointed!

collard burritocollard wrap

These big, bold beautiful leaves are not only tasty, but full of nutrients that will prepare your body for the season. Collards are in the same family as kale and cabbage. This leafy green powerhouse is loaded with vitamin C, vitamin A, and vitamin K. They’re leaves and stems are also packed with vital minerals such as iron, calcium, copper, manganese, selenium, and zinc.

Whether you get your greens from your local grocery store or out of your own back yard, collards are a tasty, nutrient-dense addition to any meal.